29/11/14

INTERVIEW WITH JOE BOUCHARD: AMONG BASS, GUITAR AND LEGEND/ TRA BASSO, CHITARRA E LEGGENDA


This site is mainly focused on electric bass as well as bass players, and Joe Bouchard has been and he still is an epoch making bassist, he played with the greatest (and loved by me) Blue Öyster Cult just in their most important period, the most expressive one which started from the first seminal album dated 1972 and then culminated in Club Ninja of 1986. The Blue Öyster Cult proved to be one of the most original group on the rock scene among the all-time greats; a rock'n'roll band, surely, but very sophisticated, too. They got an upscale sound which was performed honestly, structurally and authentically. Maybe they were too varied for the hard rockers and too rock for snobs. And their way to be so uncatchable make sense of the strenghtness showed by this musical institution.
Joe Bouchard has been the unfailing motor of this legend. But... But Joe Bouchard isn't only a bassist. He is a complete musician, an excellent guitarist as well as a multi-instrumentalist.
After he left Blue Öyster Cult in 1986, Joe Bouchard confirmed his talent by undertaking his varied and creative solo career, as his own records and the collaboration with Dennis Dunaway (on bass) and Neal Smith (on drums) showed (they have been already the cornerstone of Alice Cooper's groups), under the abbreviation BDS, precisely.
We find Dennis Dunaway also in the valuable project Blue Coupe, led by Joe with his brother Albert on drums, central figure of B.Ö.C.
Joe Bouchard looked forward, he prefered letting sprout new flowers than succombing to the operation nostalgia's trends; listening to his music makes it possible to understand who he was and still is, but we always be surprised by his countinous evolution.
I contacted Joe for an interview, and about that I must come back with great pleasure to the already experimented concept which indicates the greatest people as the most willingness as well as the kindest ones. It's special and inspiring for me catching the opportunity to interview a man whose bass lines are so deep and full, which filled my life for so many years, and they contributed in a foundamental way to get me to love bass and music.


    LDP: Joe, thank you to allow me this interview. The nice thing is that, with you, it's hard to know where to beguin; it's natural and proper to mention the B.O.C but you were able to realize and strenghten your soloist career. So here it is my first question: do you still play guitar or do you prefer playing bass in this moment? In some of your projects you usually face guitar, so as to create an amazing situation, you and Dennis Dunaway in the same band... and him on the bass! Just tell us a little about it.
    J.B.: Luca, first, thank you for doing this interview. At the moment I prefer playing guitar over bass guitar. I was always a guitar player from my earliest performances at the age of 10.
    I feel I sing better when playing the guitar. I love to sing, but singing and playing bass at the same time was always hard for me.
    Playing guitar makes it easier for me to front the band as the lead vocalist.
    I love playing guitar solos too. Most of my bass playing with Blue Öyster Cult was in a supportive capacity especially since Buck Dharma was, and is, a great soloist.
    I started playing electric bass when I was at Ithaca College where I played in a latin-jazz band for two years.
    The leader of that college band was my guitar teacher, and he had written out charts for all our songs.
    I became good at sight reading charts and eventually we could play read song charts at a gig with no rehearsal.
    With Blue Öyster Cult there were no written charts other than a few times where I would write out a very basic chord chart.
    Mostly the music was played from memory and watching others play their parts.
    Dennis is a very gifted bass player with amazing stage presence.
    We play very well together in Blue Coupe and I’ve played with him for years before that in our groups, BDS (Bouchard Dunaway and Smith) and Deadringer.
    It was a natural progression to work with my brother Albert as he is also gifted as a drummer, songwriter, singer and arranger.
    When producing my solo albums I play all the bass, and I like the idea that many of the old Blue Öyster Cult fans like I am playing bass on those recordings. When returning to bass after months s of guitar I find bass play more relaxing than playing guitar. There is less pressure for me since I don’t feel the need to be in the spotlight like I am as a guitarist.

    LDP: I think that your bass playing in the B.O.C was different from the typical approach of some other groups classified as hard rock. A melodic angle, of intelligent counterpoint, as well as dynamic. Do you think that this kind of openness and creativity result from your qualities as multi-instrumentalist?
    J.B.: My college degree is in classical piano. I love rock music, especially the early rock of my youth, but I’ve studied all kinds of music for my whole life.
    I like great melodies and inventive supporting parts. I did not have the technical ability to become a concert pianist, but that background helped me think of music from a wide range of influences.
    For me it is easy to improvise at the piano and come up with interesting parts.
    I also play banjo (my first stringed instrument before guitar), mandolin, and a little trumpet.
    With Blue Öyster Cult we were trying to be different and cutting edge from what was popular at the time.
    Our manager Sandy Pearlman was a big influence on what we did. He was very forward thinking and wanted us to be different than most other artists. He did not care for most popular music, but did want us to be successful and he encouraged us to focus our music in a strong artistic direction.

    LDP: You realized two remarkable soloist albums “Jukebox from my head” and “Tales from the island”, two examples of very different and innovative works. Would you like to tell us anything about “New solid black” and any other new project?
    J.B.: Thanks for asking about my solo projects. Jukebox In My Head is my first solo album. It started as a desire to do an album with mostly acoustic guitar. Most recordings I’ve done have been hard rock with electric guitars. I asked Michael Cartellone, the current drummer with Lynyrd Skynyrd, to play the drum tracks on Jukebox in My Head and he did a fantastic job. Michael’s drum parts sounded so strong it needed more electric guitars to fill out the sound, so I abandoned the idea of an all acoustic album. It worked out fine and there are some songs that hold up well to my earlier work with Blue Öyster Cult. I think that this album is diverse stylistically, but that came from having to write most of the songs in a hurry.
    Tales from the Island was my second solo album and I had more time to develop the material. I play all the parts, vocals, and keyboards on that recording. It is a true solo album. It was a lot of fun to do. About half of the songs were written by my good friend John Elwood Cook whom I’ve known since childhood. He is a great lyricist and writes deeply emotional songs. The final recording and mixing happened quite quickly since we were developing material for the Blue Coupe second album and we had booked a show in Corsica. I felt a need to get the album done before the tour and before the recording of Blue Coupe went into production.
    New Solid Black is my third album, an EP with six songs, is an experiment in doing an album that is shorter. A producer from California suggested that Tales from the Island be released as two EPs, but I did not do it that way. Right now New Solid Black is available as a digital download only. I am working on a pressing for a physical CD soon that will have two more bonus songs. I am working on the bonus tracks, and it will have a slightly different cover art than the digital only version.
    I plan a fourth solo album in 2015 but the songs are only rough sketches now.  There will also be a new Blue Coupe album coming in the next year or so. Blue Coupe recording usually take longer to do since all three of us have to agree on the songs and performances.

    LDP: The fact of having been a part of a band that can be easly ranked among the all-time greats could lead to a sense of satiety, satisfaction, which is not always positive (just think of those members of great bands who hadn't the same fortune as soloist). You, on the contrary, were able to clearly shape your new path of improvement, was it easy for you?
    J.B.: One reason is this era of home recording is amazing. I can record myself for almost free on my own time. I have a nice home studio and I feel comfortable with my guitars, basses and microphones. I just love the recording process and I don’t mind producing myself. Sometimes I have to play the game of “good cop” versus “bad cop” my producer personality being the “bad cop”. Since I’ve worked with many great music producers, I try to imagine how tough they would be on me and my performances. I’ve learned how to engineer myself too. It’s taken years to get comfortable with the situation but I love doing it.

    LDP: It' not hard to imagine that you own a considerable number of different instruments. May I ask you what kind of basses do you prefer? What's your relationship with frettless?
    J.B: Compared to many rock stars I do not have that many instruments. I own about 20 guitars and 5 basses. Lately I’ve been learning how to fix guitars and set them up so they play and sound great. I get the sounds I need, and that works for me. I recently bought a guitar at a pawn shop that was great. I’m thinking will get more guitars if I can find them for bargain prices.
    The bass I use the most for recording is my black Music Man Stingray. It was the bass that I played on Blue Öyster Cult’s “Burnin’ for You”. It’s a magical instrument that always records well. I like my Fender P-bass that I played on the Reaper, but it’s harder to make that one work in a mix situation. I have two 5 string basses a Fender P-Bass Deluxe and an Ibanez, but I only use them when I need low notes like D or C.
    I think I’d love to find the ultimate Fender bass, possibly a Jazz bass with great wood and resonance, but I haven’t found it yet. I don’t have a fretless bass. I’d love to have one.
    I teach upright bass to young students and I borrowed an upright for the New Solid Black album that I played on two songs, Memorial Day and Last Call. I also do bowing on the upright bass. Mostly I’m a beginner on that instrument.

    LDP: You are also a great producer. What do you remember about your production for The Liege Lord's album? It was a particular band, with an unusual sound.
    J.B: Almost all of the Liege Lord’s songs album were recorded before I came into the production. I did work on the production of a few lead vocal tracks. Most of my work was with mixing. Glad you like it.
    After I left playing with Blue Öyster Cult I produced 5-6 indie bands in the late '80s. Most of the bands did not succeed, and I had to postpone dreams of becoming a great producer until I could produce myself about 20 years later.
    LDP: In an interview of some years ago I read an answer of yours concerning the possibility of publishing your biography. Do you consider that, at the moment?
    J.B.: I’m just finishing writing an educational book called Teach Yourself to Play Rock Keyboards for Alfred Publishing. It’s a very easy beginner’s book, but it’s taken me a long time to write. I’ve written about 6 educational books and two DVDs for Alfred in the past. They are good sellers and I think this new one will do very well.
    I am working on my archive, cataloging tapes and memorabilia. I did an inventory of my instruments and some I totally forgot that I owned. Should I retire from working so hard, I might consider writing a biography. It’s been an interesting life. Rock books often do well. Keith Richards’s book was a great read and a game changer in the publishing business. Dennis Dunaway has his biography coming out in 2015. It’s an amazing book as I’ve heard all the stories many times over on the long drive we take with Blue Coupe. It’s coming out on a major publisher St. Martin’s Press. His co-writer Chris Hodenfield says it’s a very humorous book as well.
    LDP: Here it is my last question, which is required and also meets one of my old curiosity: who were your main model as guitarist and bassist?
    J.B.: As a guitarist I think Chuck Berry is my biggest influence. He is the source for most rock guitar. Simple, direct and energetic. I love early rock instrumentals like the Ventures and Duane Eddy, and the surf guitarists like Dick Dale, and Carl Wilson.
    As a bassist Paul McCartney looms large as a personal influence. I always thought of him more as a songwriter and fabulous singer, and his bass parts seemed to me was often a side venture. But that being said the Macca always lays down great parts.
    The bassist I quite admire and share similar traits with is Roger Glover from Deep Purple, more than anyone else. But I love the classic bassists like Jack Bruce and Jack Casady. And where would bass be without the funk guys like James Jamerson, Bootsy Collins, Larry Graham and more? Geddy Lee is great too. Dennis Dunaway is amazing for his creativity and originality and his melodic sense is amazing.

        LDP: Thank you very much Joe!
        J.B: You are welcome!

©Luca De Pasquale
translated by Manuela Avino

JOE BOUCHARD'S PARTIAL DISCOGRAPHY:

Joe Bouchard solo:
Jukebox In My Head
Tales From The Island
Memorial Day (cd single)
New Solid Black EP

Blue Öyster Cult:
Blue Öyster Cult 1972
Tyranny And Mutation 1973
Secret Treaties 1974
On Your Feet Or On Your Knees 1975
Agents Of Fortune 1976
Spectres 1977
Some Enchanted Evening 1978
Mirrors 1979
Cultosaurus Erectus 1980
Fire Of Unknown Origin 1981
Extraterrestrial Live 1982
The Revolution By Night 1983
Club Ninja 1985
Live 1976

X Brothers:
Dedicated Followers Of Fashon
Beyond The Valley Of The X
Solid Citizens

Blue Coupe:
Tornado On The Tracks
Million Miles More

Deadringer:
Electricution Of The Heart


INTERVISTA A JOE BOUCHARD: TRA BASSO, CHITARRA E LEGGENDA.

Questo sito si occupa prevalentemente di basso elettrico e di bassisti elettrici, e Joe Bouchard è stato ed è un bassista epocale, ha suonato con i grandissimi (e da me amatissimi) Blue Öyster Cult nel periodo focale, quello di maggior vigore espressivo della band, dal primo seminale disco del 1972 a Club Ninja del 1986. I Blue Öyster Cult sono stati una delle band più originali della scena rock di tutti i tempi; rock'n'roll, certo, ma molto sofisticato. Sofisticati in modo sincero, strutturale, non artefatto; troppo sfaccettati per gli hard rockers, forse, e troppo rock per gli snob: e questo essere inafferrabili dà il senso della forza di questa istituzione musicale.
Joe Bouchard è stato il motore inesausto di questa leggenda. Ma...ma Joe Bouchard non è solo un bassista. È un musicista completo, chitarrista notevolissimo e multistrumentista.
Lasciati i Blue Öyster Cult nel 1986, Joe Bouchard ha confermato il suo talento cimentandosi in una carriera solista variegata e all'insegna della creatività, come dimostrato dalle sue incisioni in solo e dalla collaborazione con Dennis Dunaway (basso) e Neal Smith (batteria), (già colonne portanti dei gruppi di Alice Cooper) sotto la sigla BDS, appunto.
Dennis Dunaway, lo troviamo anche nell'eccellente progetto Blue Coupe, portato avanti da Joe con il fratello Albert alla batteria, anch'egli figura centrale dei B.O.C.
Joe Bouchard ha guardato avanti, ha preferito lasciar germogliare fiori nuovi che cedere alla moda delle operazioni nostalgia; ascoltando la sua musica possiamo comprendere chi è stato e chi è, ma rimanendo sempre sorpresi dall'evoluzione continua.
Contatto Joe per un'intervista, e a proposito di questo devo ritornare piacevolmente sul concetto ormai sperimentato che vuole i grandi come i più disponibili e gentili. È particolare e stimolante per me poter rivolgere delle domande ad un uomo le cui linee di basso profonde e intense hanno accompagnato tanti anni della mia vita, contribuendo in modo fondamentale a farmi amare il basso e la musica.

    LDP: Joe, grazie per avermi concesso quest'intervista. La cosa bella è che con te non si sa da dove iniziare; è naturale e doveroso accennare ai B.O.C., ma tu hai saputo costruire e rinsaldare un interessantissimo percorso da solista. La mia prima domanda è: suoni ancora il basso o stai preferendo la chitarra? In alcuni dei tuoi progetti ti cimenti alla chitarra, creando così una situazione fantastica, tu e Dennis Dunaway in una stessa band... e lui al basso! Raccontaci un po'.
    J.B.: Luca, innanzitutto grazie per avermi proposto questa intervista. Al momento preferisco suonare la chitarra piuttosto che il basso.. Sono sempre stato un chitarrista sin dalle mie prime performance tenute all'età di dieci anni. Credo di cantare meglio quando suono la chitarra. Amo cantare, ma accompagnarmi con il basso al contempo mi risulta difficile. Suonare la chitarra mi rende più semplice impersonare la band come voce solista. Mi piace anche cimentarmi negli assoli di chitarra. Molte delle mie esibizioni con il basso nei Blue Öyster Cult fungevano da supporto specialmente da quando Buck Dharma è stato, ed è, un grande solista.
    Ho iniziato a suonare il basso quando frequentavo l'Ithaca College, dove ho suonato in una band latin-jazz per due anni. Il leader di quel gruppo del College era il mio insegnante di chitarra, e lui ha scritto i tabulati di tutte le nostre canzoni. Divenni bravo nella lettura a prima vista e alla fine eravamo in grado di eseguire i tabulati delle canzoni ai concerti senza nessuna prova. Con i Blue Öyster Cult non c'erano tabulati scritti a parte le poche volte in cui dovevo scrivere accordi davvero essenziali. Per lo più la musica veniva interpretata a memoria, seguendo gli altri che suonavano le loro parti.
    Dennis è un bassista davvero dotato, con una presenza sul palco davvero travolgente. Suoniamo molto bene inseme nei Blue Coupe ed ho suonato con lui per anni prima che nei nostri gruppi, i BDS (Bouchard Dunaway and Smith) ed i Deadringer. E' stato naturale per me lavorare con mio fratello Albert dal momento che anche lui è dotato come batterista, songwriter, cantante ed arrangiatore. Quando produco i miei album solisti suono tutto al basso, e mi piace l'idea che i vecchi fan dei Blue Öyster Cult gradiscano che io suoni il basso in quei dischi. Quando ritorno al basso dopo mesi di chitarra trovo che sia più rilassante suonare il primo rispetto alla seconda. C'è meno pressione per me dato che non avverto il bisogno di stare sotto i riflettori, come invece lo sono in qualità di chitarrista.

    LDP: Ho sempre pensato che il tuo stile al basso nei B.O.C fosse diverso dall'approccio tipico di altre band classificate nell'hard rock. Un approccio melodico, di contrappunto intelligente, una sorta di gioco di sponda sonoro; pensi che quest'apertura mentale e creativa derivi dalle tue qualità di multistrumentista?
    J.B.: La mia laurea è in pianoforte classico. Amo la musica rock, specie il primo rock della mia adolescenza, ma ho studiato tutti i generi di musica per tutta la mia vita. Mi piacciono le belle melodie e le parti di supporto creative. Non avevo l'abilità tecnica per diventare un pianista concertista, ma quel background mi ha aiutato a intendere la musica a partire da un ampio spettro di influenze. Per me è semplice improvvisare al piano e venirmene con interventi interessanti. Inoltre suono il banjo (il mio primo strumento a corde prima della chitarra), il mandolino ed una piccola tromba.
    Con i Blue Öyster Cult tentavamo di essere differenti e all'avanguardia rispetto a quello che era popolare in quel periodo. Il nostro manager Sandy Pearlman, ha esercitato una grande influenza su quello che facevamo. Era davvero avanti e voleva che noi ci distinguessimo di più dagli altri artisti. Non si curava della musica più popolare ma voleva che noi avessimo successo e ci incoraggiava a focalizzare la nostra musica su un indirizzo fermamente artistico.

    LDP: Hai fatto uscire due notevoli dischi in solo, “Jukebox from my head” e “Tales from the island”, lavori molto variegati e freschi. Ci puoi parlare anche di “New solid black” e di eventuali nuovi progetti?
    J.B.: Grazie per la domanda sui miei progetti da solista. “Jukebox In My Head” è il mio primo album da solo. Tutto è partito dal desiderio di realizzare un disco con una prevalenza di chitarra acustica. La maggior parte delle incisioni che ho fatto sono state hard rock con chitarre elettriche. Chiesi a Michael Cartellone, l'attuale batterista dei Lynyrd Skynyrd, di suonare le tracce di batteria nell'album Jukebox In My Head ed ha fatto un lavoro fantastico. Le parti di Micheal suonavano così potenti che risultò necessario l'inserimento di più chitarre per sorreggere il sound, così ho abbandonato l'idea di un album totalmente solista. E' venuto fuori un buon lavoro, e ci sono alcune canzoni che reggono bene il confronto con i primi pezzi dei Blue Öyster Cult. Penso che questo album sia stlisticamente differente, ma ciò è stato dovuto alla fretta in cui ho scritto la maggior parte delle canzoni.
    Tales From The Island è stato il mio secondo album solista ed ho avuto molto più tempo per sviluppare il materiale. Suono tutte le parti, le sezioni vocali, e le tastiere in quel disco. E' davvero un album solista. E' stato molto divertente da realizzare. Circa la metà delle canzoni sono state scritte dal mio buon amico John Elwood Cook, che conosco da quando ero ragazzo. E' un grande paroliere e scrive pezzi profondamente toccanti. La registrazione ed il mixaggio finali sono avvenuti molto velocemente dal momento che avevamo già sviluppato del materiale per il secondo album dei Blue Coupe e eravamo stati ingaggiati per un concerto in Corsica. Sentii il bisogno di finire l'album prima del tour e prima che il disco dei Blue Coupe fosse in produzione.
    New Solid Black è il mio terzo album, un EP con sei canzoni, è stato un esperimento fare un disco più breve. Un produttore californiano consigliò che Tales from the island venisse fatto uscire in due EP, ma non lo feci. Proprio ora New Solid Black è disponibile solo in download digitale. Lavorerò presto e con urgenza ad un CD fisico che abbia due bonus songs in più. Sto lavorando alle tracce, ed avrà una coperina leggermente diversa rispetto alla versione unicamente digitale.
    Ho in cantiere un quarto album solista per il 2015 ma le canzoni sono solo degli schizzi preliminari per adesso. Ci sarà anche un nuovo album dei Blue Coupe previsto per l'anno prossimo o giù di lì. L'album dei Blue Coupe di solito prende molto più tempo dato che tre di noi devono accordarsi sulle canzoni e le performance.

    LDP: Aver fatto parte di una delle più grandi band del mondo può portare ad una specie di sazietà, di appagamento e questo non sempre è positivo (vedi tanti musicisti di grandi gruppi con scadenti carriere soliste). Tu invece hai dato un'impronta immediata al tuo nuovo cammino, ti è stato facile?
    J.B.: Una spiegazione è che questa era dell'home recording è fantastica. Posso registrare il mio lavoro da solo quasi gratis e con i miei tempi. Ho uno studio a casa carino e mi sento a mio agio con le mie chitarre, i miei bassi ed i miei microfoni. Adoro proprio la fase di registrazione e non intendo autoprodurmi. Alcune volte devo giocare al gioco del “buon poliziotto” contro il “poliziotto cattivo”, la personalità del mio produttore impersona il poliziotto cattivo. Dal momento che ho lavorato con molti grandi produttori di musica, io provo ad immaginare quanto sarebbero duri con me e con le mie esibizioni. Ho anche imparato a fare il tecnico del suono da solo. Ci sono voluti anni per sentirmi a mio agio nel ruolo ma adoro farlo.

    LDP: Non mi è difficile immaginare che tu disponga di un parco strumenti formidabile. Posso chiederti che bassi preferisci? Che rapporto hai con il basso fretless?
    J.B.: A confronto con molte star del rock non ho tutti questi strumenti. Posseggo circa venti chitarre e cinque bassi. Di recente ho imparato ad aggiustare le chitarre e a settarle così da conferire loro un bel sound. Scelgo i suoni di cui ho bisogno e che funzionino per me. Ultimamente ho comprato una chitarra al banco dei pegni che era grande. Inizio a pensare che potrei comprare più chitarre se le trovassi a prezzi più convenienti.
    Il basso che uso di più per incidere è il mio black Music Man Stingray. E' il basso che suonavo nel pezzo dei Blue Öyster Cult “Burnin' for you”. E' uno strumento magico che registra sempre bene. Mi piace il mio Fender P-Bass che ho suonato su “Reaper”, ma è più difficile realizzare quel primo lavoro in una situazione mista. Ho due bassi a quattro corde, un Fender P-Bass Deluxe ed un Ibanez, ma li uso solo quando ho bisogno di note gravi come un Re ed un Do. Credo che mi piacerebbe trovare l'ultimo Fender, possibilmente un basso Jazz con un ottimo legno ed una risonanza fantastica, ma non l'ho ancora trovato. Non posseggo un fretless. Mi piacerebbe averne uno. Insegno il basso verticale agli studenti giovani, e ne presi in prestito uno per il disco New Solid Black, suonandolo in due canzoni, Memorial Day e Last Call. Mi piace anche piegarmi sul basso verticale.
    Per lo più ho un approccio da principiante a quello strumento.

    LDP: Sei anche un ottimo produttore. Che ricordi hai della tua produzione per il disco dei Liege Lord? Era un gruppo particolare, con un sound insolito.
    J.B.: Quasi tutte le canzoni dell'album Liege Lord sono state incise prima che andassi in produzione. Feci del lavoro sulla produzione di poche tracce come voce solista. Buona parte del mio intervento è stato focalizzato sul mixaggio. Sono contento che ti piaccia.
    Dopo aver smesso di suonare con i Blue Öyster Cult, ho prodotto 5-6 gruppi indie negli ultimi anni '80. La maggioranza delle band non ebbero successo, e dovetti rimandare il sogno di diventare un bravo produttore fino a quando non ho prodotto me stesso circa venti anni più tardi.

    LDP: In una tua intervista di qualche anno fa ho letto una tua risposta in merito ad una domanda circa la possibilità di scrivere una tua biografia. È un qualcosa che prendi in considerazione, al momento?
    J.B.: Sto giusto finendo di scrivere un libro di formazione intitolato “Teach your self to Play Rock Keyboards” per la Alfred Publishing. E' un libro molto semplice per i principianti, ma mi ha preso molto tempo scriverlo. Ho scritto circa sei guide didattiche e due DVD per la Alfred in passato. Sono dei bravi venditori e credo che quest'ultimo in uscita andrà molto bene.
    Sto lavorando al mio archivio, catalogando tape e memorabilia. Ho steso un inventario dei miei strumenti e alcuni avevo totalmente dimenticato di averli. Dovrei smettere di lavorare così duramente e considerare di scrivere una biografia. E' stata una vita interessante. I libri rock spesso vanno bene. Il libro di Keith Richards è stata una grande lettura ed un punto di svolta per il business editoriale. La biografia di Dennis Dunaway deve uscire nel 2015. E' un libro fantastico dato che ho sentito tutte le storie più volte durante il lungo percorso che abbiamo intrapreso con i Blue Coupe. Verrà pubblicato da una Major dell'editoria, la St. Martin's Press. Il suo co-curatore Chris Hodenfield dice che è anche un libro molto divertente.

    LDP: Ti faccio l'ultima domanda, che è obbligata e soddisfa anche una mia vecchia curiosità: quali sono stati i tuoi modelli come chitarrista e bassista?
    J.B.: Come chitarrista credo che Chuck Berry sia la mia più grande influenza. E' la fonte principale per la chitarra rock. Semplice, diretto ed energico. Amo i primi rock strumentali come i Ventures e Duane Eddy, e chitarristi surf come Dick Dale e Carl Wilson.
    Come bassista Paul McCartney incombe in qualità di influenza personale. Ho sempre pensato a lui come ad un songwriter ed un cantante favoloso, e le sue parti al basso mi sembravano spesso una attività di supporto. Ma bisogna dire che il Macca interpreta sempre delle grandi parti.
    Il bassista che ammiro molto e con cui condivido tratti più similari è Roger Glover dei Deep Purple, più di chiunque altro. Ma adoro bassisti classici come Jack Bruce e Jack Casady. E dove dovrebbe essere il basso senza ragazzi funky come James Jamerson, Bootsy Collins, Larry Graham ed altri? Anche Geddy Lee è un grande. Dennis Dunaway è emozionante per la sua creatività ed originalità ed il suo senso della melodia è entusiasmante.

       LDP: Grazie Joe!
       J.B.: Non c'è di che!


©Luca De Pasquale
traduzione a cura di Manuela Avino


DISCOGRAFIA JOE BOUCHARD:

Joe Bouchard solo:
Jukebox In My Head
Tales From The Island
Memorial Day (cd single)
New Solid Black EP

Blue Öyster Cult:
Blue Öyster Cult 1972
Tyranny And Mutation 1973
Secret Treaties 1974
On Your Feet Or On Your Knees 1975
Agents Of Fortune 1976
Spectres 1977
Some Enchanted Evening 1978
Mirrors 1979
Cultosaurus Erectus 1980
Fire Of Unknown Origin 1981
Extraterrestrial Live 1982
The Revolution By Night 1983
Club Ninja 1985
Live 1976

X Brothers:
Dedicated Followers Of Fashon
Beyond The Valley Of The X
Solid Citizens

Blue Coupe:
Tornado On The Tracks
Million Miles More

Deadringer:
Electricution Of The Heart



26/11/14

BAREND "THE BASS BEAR": INTERVIEW WITH BAREND COURBOIS / INTERVISTA A BAREND COURBOIS



Barend Courbois is an incredible bassist. He's able to play in so different contexts, always with a great personality, he's one of the tutelary deity in the rock and hard bass playing (and not just it), an artist who never stops getting out there.
I entered in contact with Barend's music by discovering, a lot of years ago, Vengeance, an excellent made in Holland classic hard rock group with whom Barend played the bass for many years.
Then I found him again with Ian Parry, with the great singer Gary Barden, as well as in the strong trio Whistler/Courbois/Whistler, and now I look forward to the new record coming out of both legendary Blind Guardian and of the trio with Timo Somers.
The Netherlands is certainly one of the most prolific country as regards bassists, and not by chance, among his main influences Barend mentions the mythical Herman Deinum, historic bassist of Cuby+Blizzards.
Surely, Barend Courbois doesn't belong only to a session men's cathegory, because playing with his own personal style belongs to him naturally: he's one of those artists who makes his mark in a spontaneous way.

LDP: Barend, first of all, thank you for this interview that I wanted to propose to you since a long time. In your biographical notes we read that you made your first concert when you were only eleven years old! How did you start to play and why did you choose electric bass?
B.C.: Thanks you're welcome and hi there Bass lovers..
     I come from a very musical and artistic family on both sides of my parents, so it was a natural thing for me to do something creative..as you maybe all know, my dear father is one of the best and last jazz drummers in the World, so I started to hit his drums when I was around 4 years, I also played the Indian Tabla (love Indian music, Paps brought those records back home from his big India tours) and the Scottish Back Pipe (in the earl '70s we used to go to our family in Scotland), around my 8 year from one minute to the other I wanned to play bass..now looking back I knew that I never be that good drummer as paps, but I still do quiet a bit of drum patterns and with my left and right hand on the bass.
Yep my first public appearances was at 11 years old, since than I never stopped doing concerts, and I'm over 4000 shows now.

LDP: Would you like to draw up a balance of your career? You have entered in contact with many cult musicians, including Jason Becker, Zakk Wylde, Vengeance, Ian Parry’s Consortium, now Blind Guardian… I suppose that you are very satisfied with your path. Why don't you tell us about it?
B.C.: Yep I'm a very lucky person...but I also got a very Spartan discipline to work f.cking hard...so if you got a reputation for doing a good bass job, good sound and equipment, knowing a couple of things about music, be a positive nice and intelligent human bieen, who also got a great sens of humor...artists, managers, producers, record company's will ask you back for more tours and of recordings...so that's how I build up my long carrier.

LDP: Despite playing all the styles, what do you like more? Fingerstyle or pick? You slap easily and with a great groove, do you like it? How's your relationship with fret less bass?
B.C.: I started out playing with a pick (was quite normal in the '70s), than my fingers, and when I saw Larry Graham for the first time I incorporated the “Thump style”....so I always practice everything I do with 3 different technics...plectrum, fingers and thumb...I try to play with every 3 as fast and accurate possible, without hardly hearing any differences....fretless is a thing that I never studied that hard on, but I can handle it very well in the studio...live is an other story haha.

LDP: The Netherlands is a country where music still seems to work, it is not dominated and overwhelmed by consumer strategies. Is it so?
B.C.: I don't know, but when I started as a kid, you could play 4 night a week, but those days are over...but music industry wise we are quite 'hip' with new things from the other side of the Atlantic...

LDP: You made a solo record, "Tunes for a friend" (by the way, I'm still trying hard to find it..), that I've got to listen to and that shows different influences; you usually feel comfortable with hard tracks as well as blues and fusion. This eclecticism of yours is considerable, how did you get there?
B.C.: I will send to you a copy...got like 100 left.
     Yea I like different musical styles (as long as it's raw and honest) so my own style got so much differed influences and elements, so I almost play the same shit in every style hahaha it fit's them all!!!!

LDP: Are you planning to work on any other projects with your name on it?
B.C: Between my first solo record and now, i never had the time to make a new one (always on the road), I have so many songs waiting to be recorded, my dear young friend (and the son of my best friend...the late Jan Somers) gonna produce the album

LDP: Let's talk about bass playing's influences. Previously you mentioned magic names like Jaco, Stanley Clarke, Geddy Lee, Marcus Miller, Larry Graham, the great Stu Hamm and Herman Deinum, the last of whom unfortunately is still little known here in Italy. Do you think that the emancipation of bass is still needed to develop? How do you look at the present scene? Do you prefer any bassists, in particular?
B.C.: My bass influences: Yea there are quet a lot...you forgot to name Doug Wimbish (a.o. Living Colour, Seal) who is one of my biggest influences ...groove wise, sound wise, his creative use of effects pedals and so much other things....what a hero !!!...yep of course Jaco...what can I say about him ?...yep, there's only one thing that's comes in my mind is the word GOD !!!...Stanley 'Stan the Man' love him !!!!...Larry Graham....haha what a hero...he still blows me away with his power, sound and his positive vibe, Geddy Lee...man 'o man what I was a Rush fan (and still are) back when I was a kid, I could join a Rush tribute band and do a concert on the same evening without a rehearsal, I do the 'Geddy' note for note...he's in my blood and bones !!!! Marcus Miller...holy shit..the best timing and sound in the world...loved him since the day he started playing with hero Miles Davis, and that's in 1980.
     Stuart Hamm...major influence in the late 80's and 90's...and now we're friends...we're gonna record a duo album soon!!!!
     Ok, Herman Deinum is the most funky player with a pick/plectrum there's ever been on this planet...I've been following this giant since '77 and when I was a kid I walked back home crying after a show in our hometown of Arnhem Netherlands.... He's my biggest pic playing influence....My first song on “Tunes for a Friend” is called “Deinum” with a heavy inspired old school Fender Precision sounding lick....he's a really good friend and he's so proud of me!!!!
   Present scene???? There are so much new bad-ass sounding bass players these days, I stopped checking them out..it's too much haha...the last two heroes are Victor Wooten and Robert Trujillo.

LDP: Major records companies seem to be more afraid of taking risks; what's your opinion about the "health" in the record industry's market? Do you believe that physical recorded music has to come to an end or what else?
B.C.: Yea they afraid of taking risk yea...no money anymore for promotion or tour support...lot of things changed.


LDP: Would you like to tell us about your gear?
B.C: Oooff I got lots of stuff for differt kind of styles, but since 20 years my Hartke cabinets are always joining me...love their sound so much!!!! And amp wise I use my old Trace Elliot pre and power amp (got them when I was 18 years old...and that's a long time ago...they still work !!!!), SWR MoAmp, Hartke 3500's.

LDP: I don't want to make you my usual question about “desert island records” but I prefer to ask to you something about what you like most and that gets you exited: would you like to suggest any artists?
B.C: One of the things I like most in life, is preparing a hi quality meal. cooking food is my big hobby !!! For suggesting artist: LISTEN TO THE FIRST 6 Van Halen ALBUMS, your life becomes a lot more fun !!!

FOR MORE INFO ABOUT BAREND "THE BEAR" COURBOIS, PLEASE CHECK OUT:


and become a member of 

www.facebook.com/barendcourbois


PARTIAL DISCOGRAPHY:

Barend Courbois – Tunes For A Friend
Bert Heerink – Pop In Je Moerstaal Live
Biss – Joker In The Deck
D.D.A. Agency Presents – The Barend Courbois Band
Fitzkin – No Gutz
Gary Barden – Rock’n’Roll My Soul
Gary Barden – The Agony&Xtasy
Ian Parry – Consortium Project I
Jason Becker – Not Dead Yet! Live
Kill City Rebel – Damaged But Alive
Maxima – Blue Sky Thunder
Perfect Strangers – Outside Lookin’ In
Peter Bloem – Tin Pan Alley
Pierre Courbois – De 20 Eeuw In 20 Ljedjes
Pierre Courbois Quintet – Big Party
Project Masquerade – Nothing But Everything Will Remain
Steve Fister – Deeper In The Blues, Dodgin Bullets, Live In Europe
Tamas Szekeres – Guitarmania, Guitartales, Downbelow Station, Dream Lake
The Jimi Hendrix Music Festival (w. Walter Trout, Michael Lee Firkins, Omar Dykes, Popa Chubby)
The Project – Burning Heart (for Jason Becker)
Vengeance – Back From Flight 19
Vengeance – Back In The Ring
Vengeance – Crazy Horses
Vengeance – Greenbellies Vol. 2
Vengeance – Pieces Of Cake
Vengeance – Planet Zilch
Vengeance – Rock’n’Roll Shower 1983-1988
Vengeance – Same/Same But Different
Vengeance - Soul Collector
Whistler/Courbois/Whistler – Privilege
Whistler/Courbois/Whistler – W/C/W 91
Whistler/Courbois/Whistler – W/C/W 92
Wolfpakk – Wolfpakk

Zakk Wylde – Live At Paradiso Amsterdam NL

BAREND "THE BASS BEAR": INTERVISTA A BAREND COURBOIS



Barend Courbois è un bassista incredibile. Capace di suonare in contesti diversissimi, sempre con personalità, uno dei numi tutelari del basso rock e hard (e non solo) che non smette mai di mettersi in gioco.
Ho “incontrato” la musica di Barend scoprendo, parecchio tempo fa, i Vengeance, un ottimo gruppo olandese di hard rock classico nel quale Barend ha suonato il basso per molti anni.
L’ ho ritrovato con Ian Parry, il grande cantante Gary Barden, nell’energico trio Whistler/Courbois/Whistler e adesso attendo con ansia l’uscita del nuovo disco dei leggendari Blind Guardian e del trio con Timo Somers.
L’Olanda è certamente uno dei paesi più prolifici in fatto di bassisti, e non a caso tra le sue influenze Barend cita il mitico Herman Deinum, storico bassista di Cuby+Blizzards.
Di certo, Barend Courbois non appartiene alla categoria di session men e basta, perché suonare con un suo stile personale gli appartiene naturalmente: è uno di quei bassisti che lascia l’impronta in modo spontaneo.

LDP: Barend, innanzitutto grazie per quest’intervista, che volevo farti da tempo. Nelle tue note biografiche si legge che il tuo primo concerto è stato ad undici anni appena! Come hai iniziato e perché il basso elettrico?
B.C.: Ti ringrazio, sei il benvenuto e un saluto agli amanti del Basso.
Io provengo da una famiglia con inclinazioni musicali ed artistiche da parte di entrambi i genitori, così è stato naturale per me optare per qualcosa di creativo... come forse tutti sanno, il mio caro padre è uno dei migliori ed ultimi batteristi jazz al mondo, così ho iniziato ad esercitarmi sulla sua batteria da quando avevo all'incirca quattro anni, suonavo la tabla indiana (amo la musica indiana, papà portò con sé diversi dischi quando era di ritorno dai suoi tour) e la cornamusa scozzese (agli inizi degli anni '70 eravamo soliti andare dai nostri parenti in Scozia), verso gli otto anni da un momento all'altro decisi di suonare il basso... ora guardandomi indietro so che non avrei mai potuto essere un bravo batterista come mio padre, ma faccio ancora un bel po' di basi di batteria sia con la sinistra che con la destra al basso.
Già, la mia prima esibizione è stata a undici anni, da allora in poi non ho mai smesso di fare concerti, e sono giunto a totalizzare più di 4000 show al momento.

LDP: Tracceresti per noi una summa della tua carriera? Hai toccato gruppi e musicisti di culto, inclusi Jason Becker, Zakk Wylde, Vengeance, Ian Parry’s Consortium, ora Blind Guardian… immagino tu sia molto soddisfatto del tuo percorso. Ce ne parli?
B.C.: Sì, sono molto fortunato... ma ho anche avuto una disciplina spartana applicata duramente...così se sei rinomato per fare un buon lavoro al basso, per avere un bel sound e una strumentazione adeguata, per intenderti di un po' di musica, se sei una persona gentile ed intelligente che possiede anche un grande senso dell'umorismo... artisti, manager, produttori, etichette discografiche ti chiederanno in cambio più tour e di incidere... dunque è così che ho costruito la mia carriera.

LDP: Pur suonando tutti gli stili, cosa ti piace di più? Fingerstyle o plettro? Slappi con faciltà e groove, ti piace slappare? Il tuo rapporto con il basso fretless com’è?
B.C.: Ho iniziato a suonare con il plettro (era abbastanza normale negli anni '70), più tardi con le dita, e quando vidi Larry Graham per la prima volta adottai lo slap... così eseguo tutto con tre tecniche differenti... plettro, dita e slap... cerco di suonare con tutti e tre quanto più veloce e nel modo più preciso possibili, senza quasi percepire alcun dislivello... con il fretless non mi sono mai esercitato duramente, ma sono in grado di gestirlo molto bene in studio.. dal vivo è un'altra storia haha.

LDP: L’Olanda è un paese dove la musica sembra funzionare ancora, non dominata e travolta da logiche di consumo. È così come credo?
B.C.: Non lo so, ma quando ho iniziato da ragazzo, potevi suonare quattro notti a settimana, ma quei giorni sono finiti...ma industria musicale a parte noi siamo abbastanza ricettivi verso le nuove cose che vengono dall'altra parte dell'Atlantico.
LDP: Hai inciso un disco solista, “Tunes for a friend” (che tra l’altro sto disperatamente cercando…) che ho avuto modo di ascoltare e mostra svariate influenze; sei a tuo agio tanto in tracce dure che più jazzate, blues o fusion. Questo tuo eclettismo è notevole, come ci sei arrivato?
B.C.: Te ne spedirò una copia... me ne sono rimasti una cosa come 100 pezzi. Sì, mi piacciono diversi stili musicali (basta che siano puri e sinceri), quindi il mio stile personale accoglie così differenti influenze ed elementi, che suono quasi sempre la stessa merda in tutti gli stili hahaha, calza a pennello con tutto!!!

LDP: Hai in programma altri lavori a tuo nome?
B.C.: Tra il mio primo album solista ed ora non ho mai avuto tempo di lavorare a qualcosa di nuovo (sono sempre in giro), ho così tante canzoni che aspettano di essere incise, il mio caro e giovane amico (nonché figlio del mio migliore amico... il defunto Jan Somers) produrrà l'album.

LDP: Parliamo di influenze bassistiche. Hai citato in passato nomi magici come Jaco, Stanley Clarke, Geddy Lee, Marcus Miller, Larry Graham, il fantastico Stu Hamm e Herman Deinum, che qui in Italia è purtroppo poco conosciuto. Credi che il percorso di emancipazione del basso sia ancora in corso? Come vedi la scena oggi? Ti piace qualche bassista in particolare?
B.C.: Le mie influenze bassistiche: sì, ce ne sono parecchie... hai dimenticato di nominare Doug Wimbish (ad esempio Living Colour, Seal) che è una delle mie più grandi influenze... ritmo e suono maturi, il suo uso creativo dei pedali e molte altre cose... che eroe!!!... già certamente Jaco... che cosa posso dire su di lui?... sì, l'unica cosa che mi viene in mente è la parola DIO!!!.... Stanley “Stan the Man”, lo adoro!!!!... Larry Graham ….haha che eroe... ancora mi tramortisce con la sua potenza, il suo sound e le sue vibrazioni positive, Geddy Lee... Io sì che ero un fan dei Rush (ancora lo sono) da quando ero ragazzo, potrei partecipare ad una tribute band dei Rush e tenere un concerto la sera stessa senza prove, suono Geddy nota per nota... lui è il mio sangue e le mie ossa!!! Marcus Miller... porca merda... il miglior timing e sound al mondo... l'ho amato sin dal giorno in cui ha iniziato a suonare con l'eroe Miles Davis, ed era nel 1980. Stuart Hamm... la maggiore influenza degli ultimi anni '80 e '90.. ed ora siamo amici.. incideremo un duo album presto!!!
Ok, Herman Deinum è il musicista più funky con un plettro che non ce ne è mai stati su questo pianeta... Seguo questo gigante dal '77 e quando ero ragazzo ritornai a casa gridando dopo uno show nella nostra città di Arnhem ... Lui è la mia più grande influenza musicale... La mia prima canzone dell'album “Tunes for a Friend” si intitola Deinum con il passaggio di un Fender Precision vecchia scuola, duro e ispirato... E' davvero un buon amico ed è così orgoglioso di me!!!
Come è la scena attuale??? Ci sono così tanti bassisti tosti attualmente, ho smesso di prendere contatti con loro... è troppo haha.. gli ultimi due eroi sono Victor Wooten e Robert Trujillo.

LDP: Le major discografiche sembrano avere sempre più paura di rischiare; come consideri la “salute” del mercato discografico oggi? Credi che il supporto disco sia destinato a finire o…?
B.C.: Sì, hanno paura .. non ci sono più soldi per la promozione o il finanziamento dei tour.. un mucchio di cose sono cambiate.

LDP: Ci puoi parlare della tua strumentazione?
B.C.: Oooff posseggo un sacco di strumenti adatti a differenti tipi di stili, ma da venti anni i miei Hartke Cabinets sono sempre con me.. amo così tanto il loro sound!!! e uso il mio vecchio Trace Elliot pre ed amplificatori potenti (li ho da quando avevo diciotto anni.. è tanto tempo fa... ancora funzionano!!!) come SWR MoAmp, Hartke 3500's.

LDP: Non ti faccio la domanda sui “desert island records” ma su quello che oggi ti piace e ti emoziona: puoi suggerirci qualche nome?
B.C.: Una delle cose che mi piace fare di più nella vita è preparare pasti di alto livello. Cucinare è il mio grande hobby!!! Artisti da consigliare: ASCOLTATE I PRIMI 6 ALBUM di Van Halen, la vostra vita sarà di gran lunga più entusiasmante.

©Luca De Pasquale 2014
Traduzione a cura di Manuela Avino


PARTIAL DISCOGRAPHY:

Barend Courbois – Tunes For A Friend
Bert Heerink – Pop In Je Moerstaal Live
Biss – Joker In The Deck
D.D.A. Agency Presents – The Barend Courbois Band
Fitzkin – No Gutz
Gary Barden – Rock’n’Roll My Soul
Gary Barden – The Agony&Xtasy
Ian Parry – Consortium Project I
Jason Becker – Not Dead Yet! Live
Kill City Rebel – Damaged But Alive
Maxima – Blue Sky Thunder
Perfect Strangers – Outside Lookin’ In
Peter Bloem – Tin Pan Alley
Pierre Courbois – De 20 Eeuw In 20 Ljedjes
Pierre Courbois Quintet – Big Party
Project Masquerade – Nothing But Everything Will Remain
Steve Fister – Deeper In The Blues, Dodgin Bullets, Live In Europe
Tamas Szekeres – Guitarmania, Guitartales, Downbelow Station, Dream Lake
The Jimi Hendrix Music Festival (w. Walter Trout, Michael Lee Firkins, Omar Dykes, Popa Chubby)
The Project – Burning Heart (for Jason Becker)
Vengeance – Back From Flight 19
Vengeance – Back In The Ring
Vengeance – Crazy Horses
Vengeance – Greenbellies Vol. 2
Vengeance – Pieces Of Cake
Vengeance – Planet Zilch
Vengeance – Rock’n’Roll Shower 1983-1988
Vengeance – Same/Same But Different
Vengeance - Soul Collector
Whistler/Courbois/Whistler – Privilege
Whistler/Courbois/Whistler – W/C/W 91
Whistler/Courbois/Whistler – W/C/W 92
Wolfpakk – Wolfpakk

Zakk Wylde – Live At Paradiso Amsterdam NL